Who gets melanoma?

Anyone can get melanoma. Most people who get it have light skin, but people who have brown and black skin also get melanoma.
Some people have a higher risk of getting melanoma.

These people have the following traits:

Skin

  • Fair skin (The risk is higher if the person also has red or blond hair and blue or green eyes).
  • Sun-sensitive skin (rarely tans or burns easily).
  • 50-plus moles, large moles, or unusual-looking moles.

If you have had bad sunburns or spent time tanning (sun, tanning beds, or sun lamps), you also have a higher risk of getting melanoma.

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Also called chemexfoliation, derma peeling

Do you wish that you could simply peel signs of aging from your skin? Dermatologists use chemical peels to do just this. A chemical peel can diminish many signs of aging on the face as well as the hands, neck, and chest. 

Chemical peels also treat some skin conditions. Dermatologists use chemical peels to treat some types of acne and conditions that discolor the skin. 

Whether you receive a chemical peel to diminish signs of aging or treat a skin condition, you can see: Read full article on www.aad.org

How do dermatologists tell whether a spot is a mole?

A dermatologist’s trained eye can often tell whether a spot is a mole. 

How do dermatologists treat moles?

Most moles do not require treatment. A dermatologist will remove a mole that:

  • Bothers a patient (rubs against clothing, etc.).
  • A patient finds unattractive.
  • Could be skin cancer.

A dermatologist can remove a mole during an office visit. A few moles will require a second visit. Whether it's during 1 or 2 visits, a dermatologist can safely and easily remove a mole. Read full article on www.aad.org

DOWNLOAD BODY MOLE MAP

Acne signs

Many people think that acne is just pimples. But a person who has acne can have any of these blemishes:

  • Blackheads.
  • Whiteheads.
  • Papules.
  • Pustules (what many people call pimples).
  • Cysts.
  • Nodules.

Acne appears on the face, but it can appear on other areas of the body. Acne can appear on the back, chest, neck, shoulders, upper arms and buttocks. Read full article on www.aad.org

What happens during a chemical peel? 

Before getting a chemical peel, some patients need to follow a pre-peel skin care plan for 2 to 4 weeks. This plan can improve results and reduce potential side effects. Your dermatologist will tell you whether this is necessary.

On the day of your peel, you will first be prepped for the treatment. This includes cleansing your skin thoroughly. If you will have a deep peel, you will receive general anesthesia, which will put you to sleep. A deep peel must be performed in a surgical setting. Read full article on www.aad.org

Many people who get the virus that causes herpes never see or feel anything. If signs (what you see) or symptoms (what you feel) occur, a person may experience:

  • Tingling, itching, or burning: Before the blisters appear, the skin may tingle, itch, or burn for a day or so.
  • Sores: One or more painful, fluid-filled blisters may appear. Blisters break open and often ooze fluid and form a crust, before healing. The first time sores appear, they will show up between 2 and 20 days after a person has contact with an infected person. The sores can last from 7 to 10 days. Where the sores appear often varies with type: Read full article on www.aad.org

Genital warts appear in various sizes and shapes. Some people get a few warts. Others get many warts. The most common signs (what you see) of these warts are:

  • Small, scattered bumps that are skin-colored or a bit darker.
  • A cluster of bumps that look like cauliflower.
  • Growths in the genital area that can be raised or flat and smooth or rough.

Genital warts often have no symptoms (what someone feels). Sometimes the warts itch, burn, hurt, or bleed. Read full article on www.aad.org